man standing at a fence

This series will help us understand more about our neighbors in the US. Each of the books will contain personal stories so that we can hear their voices – What is their world like? What is different and what is the same? What do we do now? I hope you will prayerfully consider joining me on this journey, which at times may be a struggle as we come to grips with our own fears, allowing God to help us get to know our neighbors. Please contact me to reserve your spot and purchase a book (if you need one).

301-881-1881, ext. 2006

gdawson@faithworkshere.com

 

“The Cross and the Lynching Tree” by James H. Cone

July 27, 2018, 7:30-9:00pm, Room 206

The next book in “the Other” series is The Cross and the Lynching Tree by James H. Cone (1938-2018), who was the Bill and Judith Moyers Distinguished Professor of Systematic Theology at Union Theological Seminary. The book seems timely with the recent opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama .

The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this powerful work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk. Both the cross and the lynching tree represent the worst in human beings and at the same time a thirst for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning. While the lynching tree symbolized white power and black death, the cross symbolizes divine power and black life God overcoming the power of sin and death. For African Americans, the image of Jesus, hung on a tree to die, powerfully grounded their faith that God was with them, even in the suffering of the lynching era.

In a work that spans social history, theology, and cultural studies, Cone explores the message of the spirituals and the power of the blues; the passion of Emmet Till and the engaged vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.; he invokes the spirits of Billie Holliday and Langston Hughes, Fannie Lou Hamer and Ida B. Well, and the witness of black artists, writers, preachers, and fighters for justice. And he remembers the victims, especially the 5,000 who perished during the lynching period. Through their witness he contemplates the greatest challenge of any Christian theology to explain how life can be made meaningful in the face of death and injustice.

Books ($20) are available at the mailbox downstairs outside the Church Office, where you can sign up as well (you can pay on the night of the discussion). Contact Gina Dawson with any questions.

 

Previous Titles

Fear of the Other: No Fear in Love by William H. Willimon (February 24, 2017)

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (March 24, 2017)

Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance (May 19, 2017)

Strangers in Their Own Land by Arlie Russell Hochschild (July 21, 2017)

Acts of Faith: The Story of An American Muslim, the Struggle for the Soul of a Generation by Eboo Patel (September 22, 2017)

Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family by Amy Ellis Nutt (October 20, 2017)

Waking Up White and Finding Myself in the Story of Race by Debby Irving (November 17, 2017)

The Reason I Jump: The Inner Voice of a 13-Year-Old Boy with Autism by Naoki Higashida

If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?: My Adventures in the Art and Science of Relating and Communicating by Alan Alda (April 13, 2018)

person standing at a fence in the woods
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